Shuddering fragments — Boucher's montages

(I interviewed Boucher in December for the Link Newspaper)

Synchronicity binds elements within Myriam Boucher's work in such a way that they become almost sentient. Conversely, it also reveals her precision. Each definitive space within Boucher's audiovisual work is reinforced with saturative sequences. For instance, between 0:09-0:23 in headNoise, the inundating waves of fleshy rose and clay colours that could, on their own, appear comforting, bombard the observer in a instantaneous rush of sound.

The channels that lead through her vidéomusique move seamlessly between tension and emptiness. I do not feel calm, transitioning from shuddering textures to blaring panels of red, yet the intensity is gripping. Nothing can prepare you for each transition. Boucher's art can be viewed from anywhere, yet it is an injustice to limit it to a computer screen and headphones, even if you are a sound artist. They are made for cinematic screening and listening.

My most recent encounter with Boucher's artwork was at CIRMMT, McGill University's Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media, and Technology. There, I saw Nuées for the second time. The work pulses with movement — embodied through auditory and visual motifs of birds. In one instance, the frame rate decreases and accelerates, accentuating the nuances of birds in flight. Flocks are silhouetted in black against pale yellow, ochre, or upon other dark flocks themselves, evoking both magnitude and proximity. Boucher segments these panoramas with consecutive images of a bird's wingspan through cubical frames. Of course, she extends beyond the mentioned aspects within Nuées. Boucher is thorough in providing the observer with countless reinterpretations of our experiences—Nuées is one of many.